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Winema Gaven

3 months ago

Fraud Detection Solutions : How to prevent Bitcoin fraud?

Bitcoin (BTC) is an anonymous electronic payment that acts like cash. There is no chargeback or Bitcoin fraud in BTC transactions.

 

However, there is a possibility that service providers such as web hosting suffered from abuse of services by customers using BTC as anonymous payment method. FraudLabs Pro can help you to screen out these high-risk customers.

 

Below is the recommended rules to screen BTC customers using FraudLabs Pro.

 

1.    If Visitor IP is in Anonymous Proxy Record, then trigger manual review.

2.    If Visitor IP is in Blacklisted Record, then trigger manual review.

3.    If Device IP is in Blacklisted Record, then trigger manual review.

4.    If ISP Usage Type is Data Center/Web Hosting/Transit or Content Delivery Network, then trigger manual review.

5.    If Distance Between Visitor City & Shipping City > 100 miles, then trigger manual review.

3 months ago

Things to do in Suffolk , Group Holiday in Southbourne Dorset

The County of Suffolk is a combination of gently rolling woodland, river valleys and estuaries, home to busy market towns and pretty timber-framed villages.

 

The forty miles of coastline is largely unspoilt, with steep shingle terraces and low crumbling cliffs, a sign of constant battle with the sea.

 

Suffolk is famous for its vast skies, stunning coastline and delightful countryside.

 

Whatever your interests there is much to enjoy in Suffolk all year round

 

There are many attractive towns around the coastline, now designated a world heritage site of 'outstanding beauty'.

 

A distinctive feature of the Suffolk coast is its many shingle beaches, which are a haven for a fascinating mix of wildlife and plants.

 

Fishing boats can be seen resting on the raked banks of pebbles or out at sea trawling the waves and fresh fish can be purchased from the fishermen's huts on the beaches.

 

The Edwardian resort of Felixstowe has retained much of its original charm, with beautiful south facing gardens, pier, theatre, four miles of beach, historic fort and nature reserve.

The historic town of Aldeburgh situated on the site of a medieval fishing and shipbuilding centre is host to the International Aldeburgh Festival of music and the arts at Snape Maltings Concert Hall. The High Street has many attractive Georgian buildings. Historic buildings include the Moot Hall (c. 1520) and the 15th century church.

 

Southwold lies in the centre of the Heritage Coast, the River Blyth to the south and the Buss Creek to the north form the town boundaries, virtually making Southwold an island, limiting development and helping to retain Southwolds old world charm. The Suffolk Tourist Information Centre is in the High Street.

 

Lowestoft is Britain's most easterly town, famous for its maritime connections and award winning beaches. An important piece of Lowestoft's history has been recently revived in the shape of Lowestoft Porcelain. In production from 1757-1801, original examples are highly prized by collectors around the world. The new factory and gallery are open to the public.

 

Ipswich is the County town and England's oldest continuously settled town since Anglo Saxon times, with medieval streets and architectural gems. The tourist information centre is in St. Stephens Church.

 

The Heart of Suffolk is an ideal base for exploring the peaceful countryside and historic towns like Stowmarket in the Gipping valley, home to the Museum of East Anglian Life.

 

Bury St.Edmunds grew up around the powerful Abbey of St Edmund in medieval times. For five centuries it was visited by pilgrims who worshiped at the shrine of St Edmund, the martyred King of East Anglia.

 

Lavenham is one of several wool towns in Suffolk and is one of the best preserved medieval towns in the country; its appearance remains relatively untouched by time.

 

In the west of the County an area of rural hideaways include Thetford forest and countryside treats in peaceful surroundings. Newmarket, famous as the headquarters of British racing, is a thriving town with the excellent shopping facilities.

 

Sudbury, in the south of Suffolk, is the birthplace of the painter Thomas Gainsborough, and a fine collection of his works can be seen at Gainsborough's House.

 

Constable Country offers the chance to explore Dedham Vale and the Stour Valley where John Constable, one of England's most celebrated painters, found his inspiration. Walking in his footsteps offers visitors a chance to experience rural England at its most peaceful.

 

4 months ago

Careers at BGC Partners Limited Tokyo

Our Employees are central to BGC’s business strategy and recruiting and retaining top tier talent is vital to our success and the reputation of our brand.

 

Our dynamic, fast paced global business provides a challenging career opportunity for both graduates and experienced financial markets employees looking for rapid career progression. Our flat structure and meritocratic approach enable our people to really make their mark and gain maximum exposure across the business.

 

If you are looking for a unique employment experience, then we are the employer for you. BGC Partners Limited Tokyo is actively recruiting for a diverse range of opportunities. BGC Partners Limited Tokyo offer competitive pay/benefits packages and a work environment committed to professional growth. BGC and its affiliates are equal opportunity employers.

4 months ago

APPLIED CONSULTANTS, INC. – Brief Project Review

M3 Midstream – Marcellus Shale: Applied Consultants has supplied Inspection for the Greenfield project for M3 Midstream in the Marcellus Shale. This project consisted of 120 miles of 24” Transmission Pipe with numerous lateral lines. The project also consisted of 2 Compressor Stations and 2 CDP’s as well as multiple HDD’s. This system is located in the remote areas of West Virginia and South West Pennsylvania. This is the first footprint for M3 in the Marcellus Shale. This project has transitioned into the Utica with Applied supplying Inspection personnel on several large Plants and pipeline projects. Applied currently has 94 Inspectors working for M3 Midstream and M3 Utica.

Pioneer Natural Resources – EFS Midstream/Eagle Ford Shale: Applied has provided inspection and engineering services to this green field project since July 2010. With Applied’s assistance, EFS Midstream was able to in quickly develop their position in the Eagle Ford trend almost 6-8 months ahead of any of their competitors. Applied currently has approximately 50 employees working in various roles on this project. To highlight this effort; six (6) large Central Gas Processing (CGPs) facilities were engineered, constructed and brought on line within 12 months. Each of these facilities consisted of 150 gpm amine plants, glycol dehydration units and 5000 bpd condensate stabilization units. Custody transfer services were also provided at these facilities for both gas and condensate. 300 miles of 8” and 12” pipelines have been laid with numerous bores, including bores under the San Antonio River and Interstate 37. This is an on-going project that continues to keep EFS Midstream as the major contender in this trend.

Hawk Field Services/Haynesville Shale Play: Applied has effectively delivered inspection and engineering services to Hawk in a grass-roots movement to develop their position in the Haynesville play since August 2008. To support the ensuing multitude of projects, Applied currently has 54 Inspectors working on these projects in the Haynesville for Hawk Field Services. Highlighted projects during this period are 59 miles and 43 miles - 16” pipelines including 2 Red River bores with an additional 65 miles of pipeline. Our inspectors also managed the installation of several meter facility interconnects to transmission lines with a collective takeaway capacity of some 685MMCFD. Applied’s engineering staff has worked or is working on the design, drafting and installation of 7 amine plants that will total approximately 1300GPM when all are complete.

4 months ago

Pugh Heating & Air Conditioning: Why clean air ducts?

Cleaning both the HVAC unit and the ductwork has beneficial effects to your home. Duct cleaning is a method to clean the intake, return and supply ducts of your home and professionals from Pugh Heating & Air Conditioning use specialized vacuums, blowers, and brushes during the process. It includes a thorough cleaning of the HVAC system's registers, grilles, motors, fans, housings, coils and air handler.

Duct cleaning can be helpful in case of contamination in the HVAC unit and the ducts. Reviews made by Pugh Heating & Air Conditioning state that animals, contaminants, illness, mold, and renovations are some factors for duct cleaning.

Dirty ductwork might be the cause of renovation or remodeling to your home, especially if the ducts are not sealed off. Duct cleaning is needed if there was asbestos abatement, large dust, or lead paint removal. This method is also required if there was animal infestation or nesting inside your ducts. Remove first the animals then clean both the ductwork and the HVAC unit.

Mold growth is another problem that needs duct cleaning because ducts can release contaminants, debris, odors, or pet hair into your home after the registers have been vacuumed or cleaned. If you're suffering from an allergy-related illness, it would be better to consider duct cleaning as well as cleaning your HVAC unit to have a cleaner indoor air.

You should avoid fraud services online when looking for good HVAC companies on the internet, and once you found the company that is to your liking, make sure that you: check certifications and standards, check references, get free estimates, get full-service cleaning, verify results of the cleaning, avoid sprays and sealants, avoid steam cleaning and avoid any gimmicks. Good thing, the team at Pugh Heating & Air Conditioning provides service protection to their customers. Contact them for more details on alternative heating systems such as boilers, hot boilers and water heaters, and other information on their HVAC services.

5 months ago

Axia Consultants : More Complex RFP Scoring

Scoring scheme for more complex vendor RFP responses and comments

Despite requesting a particular format of response to your RFP, you may well receive a wide variety of responses and comments from vendors. Scoring these can be complicated, especially if there is no standard format. The ideal solution would be to specify and receive standard format responses. The next best - is to create a scoring scheme that categorizes the responses / comments into various categories that are useful to you. Then convert the vendor’s RFP responses into categories and associate each with a numerical score. The example below illustrates the potential solution.

The problem - a typically wide variety of vendor RFP response comments.

The functionality requirement X is achieved by:

·         Standard software AA version 1103

·         Standard software AA v1103, via tailoring screen configuration and report configuration

·         Using windows capabilities

·         Using / integrating with software BB

·         This could be achieved subject to a full specification, however, it is believed that CC tools may be utilized / interfaced to fulfill the requirement

·         Standard software AA version 1104, when released

·         Standard software AA will be offering this feature in a future release

·         A future release, further discussions are required

·         Standard software AA could offer this functionality, subject to a full specification, if customer is prepared to part sponsor this

·         Possible modifications required, pending further discussions

·         Modifications required subject to a full specification

The solution – is to either separately categorize the responses/comments and then score these, or combine the categorization and scoring eg by creating a table of RFP Response Categories and Associated Scores (with categories / scores that are useful to you), and then convert the vendor RFP responses/comments into a score.

On previous pages we have suggested a simple scoring range from 0 to 3 eg 0 = not met, 1 = partly met, 2 = fully met, 3 = exceeded expectations. But as the responses / comments are more complicated, you could use a wider scoring range say from 0 to 10 (with 10 the best, 0 the worst)

6 months ago

Financial Times: Global Souls to Run Global Company - Human Capital Alliance Inc.

William Barnes, Financial Times

Managers at international businesses must expect to move country regularly. Could this help create a class of cosmopolitan, constantly mobile workers?

Nick Leeson, the legendary destroyer of the 233-year-old Barings Bank, was by his own admission naive, immature and unworldly when he was working in Singapore in the 1990s.

Left unsupervised he secretly ran up £830m in trading losses before he was discovered. Barings was subsequently sold to a Dutch bank for £1.

Raw pride and a reluctance to admit that he was failing stopped him telling anyone about his rapidly climbing losses, he explained in a recently published book.

Mr. Leeson did not claim to be discombobulated by working in an alien environment, indeed he enjoyed the tropical social life. But he has said that if he could put the clock back, he would not have got on the plane to Singapore.

How many of today’s budding global warriors will end up wishing that they too had not “got on the plane to Singapore”?

Until a few years ago the expatriate executive was widely understood to be someone acquiring a building block of career experience that would benefit him or her and the company.

In the last few years the spread of globalization has reached the point where businesses in global markets now expect their managers to relocate with few guarantees for the future on either side. Increasingly these move-able executives will be Asian, particularly Indian and Chinese, as regional domestic Giants reach out into the world.

The old-style western expatriate has not always been appreciated. The 19th century British Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, said that when he required advice in handling a foreign country he would ask a 20-year expatriate for his opinion and then do the opposite.

But at least in the 19th century working overseas was considered a high risk gamble at best or akin to taking holy orders. It was rarely – as today – deemed ordinary and easy.

“Some people love the speed of it, the variety and excitement and the opportunity. But there are others who really don’t welcome this and do not relish what’s going on,” says Edwin Sim, managing director of Human Capital Alliance, a consultancy.